Erodible Soils Report

What is an erodible soils report?


The Erodible Soils report provides a broad scale ranking on the potential for a soil to erode in the user-selected area based on soil attributes in the surface and subsoil. Three maps are produced: a surface map, subsoil map and overall erodibility map.

 

What is included in this report?


The Erodible Soils report provides information on how likely the soils on a particular location in the Burdekin catchment and Fitzroy NRM region are susceptible to erosion through three maps:

  1. overall soil erodibility
  2. surface soil stability
  3. subsoil erodibility.

Soil erodibility on these maps is the likelihood that a particular soil is going to slake and/or disperse and be susceptible to erosion. This information has been produced specifically for areas within the Burdekin catchment.

The maps were produced for regional or sub-catchment investigations, for example comparing soils in major tributaries of rivers, and not at a property scale. The maps were produced at a scale of 1:250,000 where 1cm represents 2.5km. These maps cover an area of 45km by 45km.

 

Report sample


Report sample is available online here (PDF, 1.3 MB) .

 

Common questions about erodible soils reports


Three maps are produced for the selected Lot on Plan or adjoining Lots on Plan:

  • Overall erodibility – ‘Overall soil erodibility ranking’ map
  • Surface soil – ‘Surface soil stability’ map
  • Subsoil – ‘Subsoil dispersibility’ map
  • Soil attributes used include the amount and type of clay including clay composition (sodium and magnesium ion balance) and the salinity of the soil solution. For more detail on these attributes, see Page 5 and Glossary in the Mapping erodible soils in Burdekin Dry Tropics grazing lands User Guide to datasets (PDF, 1.5 MB) .

  • These attributes affect the likelihood that a particular soil slakes and/or disperses and whether a soil is cohesive or not.

  • The soil erodibility ranking does not take into account external factors such as topography (slope), land use and land management, rainfall intensity and ground cover.

No. This soil erodibility classification does not take into account other factors such as topography (slope), land use and land management, rainfall intensity and ground cover.

The information on potential soil erodibility and soil attributes can be used to identify areas at risk of soil erosion and hence help with land management decisions.

For example:

  • Use Map 2 (surface soil stability) to determine the nature of your surface soil.
  • Then use Map 3 (subsoil dispersibility) to determine the nature of your subsoil.
  • Using the table on Page 1 of the report, determine your soils' likely attributes. The colour of the table cell correlates with the erosion vulnerability ranking in Map 1 (overall erodibility ranking).
  • Consider your soil attributes in conjunction with the surrounding landscape (e.g. slope and vegetation cover), stock numbers and climate to assess erosion risk.

The maps were produced using data from existing and new soil profiles and data derived from airborne geophysical surveys, digital terrain models, climate and Landsat/MODIS satellite data. The data were combined using digital soil mapping methods to produce soil attribute maps. These soil attribute maps were used in a model of soil erodibility to produce the maps in this report.

For more information on these attributes, refer to the Mapping erodible soils in Burdekin Dry Tropics grazing lands User Guide to datasets (PDF, 1.5 MB) .

This report aims to rank soil potential to erode (soil erodibility), not the presence or absence of erosion. Soil erosion is influenced by numerous factors including land management, rainfall and topography as well as the soils erodibility. The maps were made using soil and land information with a resolution greater than 1ha, hence the map cannot show fine scale variations in the landscape. However, the maps are suitable for regional or catchment scale assessments.

 

Other information


For further information refer to the Erodible Soils User Guide (PDF, 1.5 MB) . Information about soil erosion is also available.

 

Last updated: 17 September 2018